5 Big Reasons (Other Than Your Mouth) That Oral Health Matters

People are often under the misconception that their dentist visit is all about maintaining their smile and appearance. Straight teeth, white teeth, etc. That's important, but it’s not the whole story.

The fact of the matter is, your oral health plays an important role in your overall health and well being. Here are five reasons how:

1) Oral Hygiene Can Affect Your Weight

This may sound outlandish, but it’s true: good oral hygiene habits can have an effect on your weight. See, brushing your teeth sends a signal to your brain that you are finished eating.

When you have an urge to snack, try brushing and see how your appetite is suppressed. Add in the fact that nothing tastes good after you’ve just brushed and you can see how good oral hygiene can help you maintain your weight.

2) Oral Infections Can Spread

Gum disease often leads to oral infections, and those infections are not just a problem for your mouth. They can spread to other parts of the body, creating digestive issues, sometimes spreading to the heart where they can cause bacterial endocarditis, and other problems.

In fact, this often works in reverse, which is how many diseases can be diagnosed through symptoms that first show up in your mouth. Some of these include heart disease, diabetes, leukemia, and kidney disease.

3) It Can Help You Look A Lot Better

We don’t need to guess: we know you don’t want your teeth look bad. Your eyes and your smile are two of the first things people notice, after all.

A good cosmetic dentist can repair many issues, but isn’t it better to avoid such issues in the first place? Good preventative oral hygiene is not only good for your overall health, it’s GREAT for how you look and feel.

4) Links Between Gum Disease And Diabetes

Those who have diabetes are more prone to gum disease. What have only recently discovered is that the link may go in both directions. Having gum disease may actually contribute to your diabetes by impacting blood glucose control.

According to the Canadian Diabetes Association, the bacteria associated with gum disease produces toxins. When your body’s immune system fights those toxins, your body’s response “can increase insulin resistance and, therefore, blood glucose levels.”

In other words, gum disease is bad for your diabetes!

5) Poor Oral Health Can Affect Your Unborn Child

Pregnant women already know that they are eating for two. What they may not realize is that poor oral health can have a direct impact in the health of their child. Experts have found a connection between periodontitis and low birth weight, as well as premature birth. That means if you want a healthy baby, be sure you have a healthy mouth, too.

The facts cannot be disputed: your oral health and your overall health go hand in hand!